Leon the Milkman

Anything dairy-related

High Coliforms in raw milk?

Hi, Dairy Farmers

Do you have high coliform bacteria counts on raw milk?

The reasons could be infection, even something like dust from construction taking place on your premises.

Another reason – your bulk tank could be taking too long to cool the milk after milking. Top farmers shoot for all the milk to be chilled to under 4°C in half an hour, but most will go for 2 hours. If it takes longer than this, you are looking for trouble.

Do not however set the bulk tank to such low temperatures that the first milk into the tank freezes – this will pop fat globules that can contribute to oiling off (lower butterfat analyses – less money to you) or rancidity, because lipase will be released.

Kind regards,

Leon the Milkman

Control Samples for milk analyses

Hi, Dairy Scientists

When using control samples on your automated milk composition tester or otherwise, make sure that the samples you use as controls are close in composition to the samples you are going to analyse.

Using skim milk samples to check a machine that you are going to do full cream milk tests on, is not the best of ideas.

Rather see of you can calibrate different channels to test skim and full cream on.

Kind regards,

Leon the Milkman

Ice Cream Pie Recipes From Dairy Keen

Hi, Dairy Fans

Try this:10 Ice Cream Cones – Sugar, or Cake Ice Cream cones
2 Tablespoons Sugar
4 Tablespoons melted Butter
10 Ice Cream Cones – Sugar, or Cake Ice Cream cones2 Tablespoons Sugar4 Tablespoons melted ButterPreheat oven to 325 degrees. Place ice cream cones in food processor and process to fine crumbs. (You should have about 1 cup). With food processor running add sugar, then add melted butter. Continue to process until the crumbs are moistened. Press crumb mixture evenly against bottom and sides of a 9-inch pie plate. Compact the crumbs with a flat bottom measuring cup. Bake crust until crisp, 8 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely before filling.

10 Ice Cream Cones – Sugar, or Cake Ice Cream cones2 Tablespoons Sugar4 Tablespoons melted ButterPreheat oven to 325 degrees. Place ice cream cones in food processor and process to fine crumbs. (You should have about 1 cup). With food processor running add sugar, then add melted butter. Continue to process until the crumbs are moistened. Press crumb mixture evenly against bottom and sides of a 9-inch pie plate. Compact the crumbs with a flat bottom measuring cup. Bake crust until crisp, 8 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely before filling.There is lots more at:

http://kutv.com/food/local_story_139122407.html

Kind regards,

Leon the Milkman

Ben & Jerry\'s Homemade Ice Cream & Dessert Book

Can I freeze raw milk?

Hi, Milk Fans

Yes, raw milk can be frozen, but make sure that you do so as soon as possible after the milk is cooled down after the milking.

If the milk is held for a few days before being frozen, psychrotrophic (Cold-loving/tolerant) bacteria will start to grow and might even deteriorate the milk while it is frozen.

Kind regards,

Leon the Milkman

Dairy farm tours

Hi, Dairy farmers

If you already have a neat and smooth running setup on your farm, and maybe a farm stall where you sell your own products, or have neighbors selling products, then you should read the following article:

http://www.wisconsinagconnection.com/story-state.cfm?Id=583&yr=2006

It is an excellent way to create an extra revenue stream.

Kind regards,

Leon the Milkman

P.S. If this interests you, here’s some more resources:

The Green Holiday Guide Spain and Portugal 2002/3: Cottages and Campsites on Organic Farms Environment-Friendly Guesthouses and B&Bs (Green Holiday Guides) Recipe for success.(tourism breathes new life into a vintage fruit farm) : An article from: Farm Journal

 Ag-Tourism Has Well-Established Roots Locally.(San Diego has many places to admire agriculture)(Brief Article) : An article from: San Diego Business Journal

Freezing point and added water

Hi, Dairy Scientists

What is the relationship between the freezing point of milk and the amount of added water?

About 0.2% of added water for every 1000th of a degree Celsius depression under -0.512 degrees Celsius.

Thus -0.513 degrees Celsius will have 0.2% added water and -0.514 degrees Celsius will have 0.4% added water, etc.

Kind regards,

Leon the Milkman

Hortvet vs. Celsius in Cryoscope

Hi, Dairy Scientists

How to convert degrees Celsius to Hortvet and vice versa?

Temp. reading in Celsius = 0.9656 x Temp. reading in Hortvet.

Temp. reading in Hortvet = 1.0356 x Temp. reading in Celsius.

Thus -0.512 Celsius = -0.530 Hortvet

Regards,

Leon the Milkman

 

Method of determining remaining milk when taking off cream

Hi, Dairy Farmers/Processors

I get asked a lot how much milk remains after cream is taken off – hope this calculation helps. If I did it wrong – please let me know 🙂Theoretically:
1000 liters of milk(you start off with)
40% fat in resulting cream(assume this is the fat % of your cream) Just substitute your cream’s tested fat % in here.


Problem 1:
What volume of milk remains when I take 3.8% butterfat milk down to 3.3%?(FULL CREAM)


3.8% – 3.3% = 0.5%

0.5% x 1000 liters = 500 parts of Fat removed

500 parts ÷ 40% cream = 12.5 Liters of cream

1000 – 12.5 =  987.5 liters milk remaining


Problem 2:
What volume of milk remains when I take 3.8% butterfat milk down to 2%?(LOW FAT)


3.8% – 2% = 1.8

1.8 x 1000 = 1800

1800 ÷ 40 = 45

1000 – 45 = 955 liters of milk remaining


Problem 3:
What volume of milk remains when I skim milk completely?


3.8% – 0% = 3.8%

3.8% x 1000 liters = 3800 parts of Fat removed

3800 parts ÷ 40% cream = 95 liters of cream

1000 – 95 = 905 liters of milk remaining

Kind regards,Leon the Milkman

Dairy Cattle Science (4th Edition) Dairy Chemistry and Biochemistry

About Me

Welcome to my Blog!
I'm Leon the Milkman,  dairy specialist and  professional cheese experimenter.

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(GMT +2) on +27(0)84 952 4685

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